3rd Missouri Infantry


 Impression Guidelines

Crowley's 3rd MO. Infantry

As Crowley's 3rd. Missouri Confederate Infantry we portray multiple

impressions of the Missouri soilder throughout the war based on

date of specific battles at events.  Our 3 main impressions are Early war

Missouri State Guard / Van Dorn's Army of the West 1861-1862, Mid-

war Confederate Missouri Brigade / Army of Tennesse 1862-

1863, and Late-war Confederate Missouri Brigade / Army of Tennesse

1864-1865.

Early-war Missouri State Guard / Van Dorn's Army of the

West 1861 - Battles of Booneville MO, Cole Camp MO, Carthage MO,

Lexington MO, Wilson's Creek MO

Mid-war Confederate Missouri Brigade / Army of the West/Army of 

Mississippi 1862-1863 - Battles of Elk Horn Tavern AK (Pea Ridge), Iuka

MS, Corinth MS, Port Gibson MS, Champion's Hill, Big Black, Siege of

Vicksburg MS

Late-war Confederate Missouri Brigade / Army of Tennesse 1864-1865 -

Battles of Lattimer House GA, Kennesaw Mountain GA, Atlanta GA,

Alltoona GA, Franklin TN, Fort Blakeley AL  

Early-war Missouri State Guard / Van Dorn's Army of the West 1861 

The early-war Missouri State Guard / Van Dorn's Army of the West impression is that of a civilian solider.  Most of these men came straight off the farm, or right out of the city with little to no military experience.  These men of the Missouri State Guard did not officially join the regular Confererate Army until 1862 and as such arrived ready to enlist in the Guard dressed in what they wore from day to day as Missouri citizens and civilians.  Without the resources of the Confederate Government these citizen soldiers served in the Missouri State Guard without standardized uniforms or regular military equipment.  It is thought that around 30% of the men had some uniformity on a company level even if it was motley and not regular army issued uniforms.  Many of these men would have taken advantage of captured uniforms and equipment from federal forces and to see some of these men dressed in blue would not be uncommon. In general this early-war Missouri State Guard / Van Dorn's Army of the West impression is a mixed bag of civilian clothing, pre-war militia uniforms, captured federal uniforms, and company level coordinated dress.  Arms and equipment would be again a mixed bag of civilian hunting / game rifles and shotguns, pre-war militia weapons, captured federal arms and equipment, farm tools, pikes, and pistols. 

 

 

Mid-war Confederate Missouri Brigade Army of the West 1862-1863

The mid-war Confederate Missouri Brigade / Army of the West impression is that of the Western Thearter Confederate Infantryman.  The men of the early war Missouri State Guard are organized into the First Missouri Confederate Brigade in Osceola, MO December 1861.  In April 1862 following the March 7-8 battle of Elk Horn Tavern ( Pea Ridge, AK ) the Brigade is transferred east of the Mississippi River.  In Sept. of 1862 the Brigade is reorganized and Gen. Cockrell takes command after the death of Gen. Little during the battle of Iuka.  The men of Cockrell's Missouri Brigade go on to fight in the battles of Corinth, Port Gibson, Champions Hill, Big Black, and finally the Seige of Vicksburg in May 16-July 3, 1863.  There are 2 seperate uniform options and impressions for this Mid-war Confederate Missouri Brigade/Army of the West 1862-1863 Impression.  The first is that of the uniforms issued to the Missouri Brigade in Arkansas on March 1-2, 1862 just prior to the battle of Elk Horn Tavern.  This uniform impression is that of the undied white sheeps wool, or ice cream suit.  Here is what Pvt. Ephraim Anderson writes about these uniforms "Our regiment was uniformed here; the cloth was of rough coarse texture, and the cutting and style would have produced a sensation in the fashionable circles: the stuff was white, never having been colored, with a goodly supply of grease - the wool had not been purified by any application of water since it had been taken from the back of the sheep"  The second impression is that of uniforms issued to the Missouri Brigade in Mississippi late 1862, what is know as the Columbus Depot jacket with grey jean wool and blue cuff and collar.  The Missouri Brigade would be in this Columbus Depot uniform up to the siege and finally the surrender at Vicksburg, MS 1863.  

 

  

 

Late-war Confederate

Missouri Brigade

Army of Tennesse

1863-1865 


The men of the early war Missouri State Guard are organized into the First Missouri Confederate Brigade in Osceola, MO December 1861. In April 1862 following the March 7-8battle of Elk Horn Tavern ( Pea Ridge, AK ) the Brigade is transferred east of the Mississippi River. In Sept. of 1862 the Brigade is reorganized and Gen. Cockrell takes command after the death of Gen. Little during the battle of Iuka. The men of Cockrell's Missouri Brigade go on to fight in the battles of Corinth, Port Gibson, Champions Hill, Big Black, and finally the Siege of Vicksburg in May 16-July 3, 1863. In December 1862/January 1863 the Missouri Brigade begins to receive its first issue of the Columbus Depot Shell Jacket along with pants, and caps. Below is documented info on this issue of uniforms to troops.

In January 1863, while encamped near Grenada, Mississippi, "there was a suit of uniform issued to every man in the Brigade [sic]. Grey Pants, grey Jackets & grey Caps. The collars & cuffs of the Jackets are trimmed [sic] with light blue." (Phillip T. Tucker, The South's Finest: The First Missouri Confederate Brigade from Pea Ridge to Vicksburg (Shippensburg, PA: White Mane Publishing Co., Inc., 1993)While in winter quarters near Grenada, Mississippi on December 24, 1862 the army was reviewed by President Davis, and Generals Johnston,Price, Loring and others. Colonel R. S. Bevier of the Missouri Brigade gives this account: "The First [Missouri] Brigade were clothed in their new uniforms of gray striped by blue, and presented a fine appearance



 

Equipment

Personal

Footwear- Period Brogans of military or civilian make

Headgear- Civilian hats such as Slouch Hats and Wheel Caps, Kepi, or Forage Caps (Missouri State Guard must be of a civilian type or previous federal issue kepi)

Shirts- Military issue shirts of the period or civilian shirts

Pants- Jean wool, wool, or cotton trousers of the period style of military or civilian

 Vest- Jean wool, wool, cotton civilian or military

Jackets (all but battle shirts and civilian coats should be made of any variation of Jean Wool unless otherwise specified):

  • Battle Shirts (appropriate for Missouri State Guard and are to be made of cotton and lightweight jean wool and other variations of wool)

  • Civilian sack coats and dress coats( appropriate for early war as the Missouri State Guard)

  • White Wool Jacket (Such as the Appler Jacket which was a variation or type of a white wool that belonged to a member of the 4th Mo)

  • Columbus Depot (mid war)

  • Dept. of Alabama(late war)

 

Alternative Jackets:

  • Frock Coat(appropriate for impression from mid to late war)

  • Commutation Jackets( appropriate for impressions from mid to late war)

  • Bach Jackets (Made of imported English army cloth and was unique that it had red tape around the neck. Appropriate for late war Trans-Mississippi troops.)

 

Socks- wool or cotton of period style

Under drawers- wool or flannel of period style

Accouterments for Regular Confederate Infantry

All accoutrements must be of "captured" federal accouterments, confederate manufactured accouterments, or imported foreign accouterments (mainly English make) based off of original specimens. One massive aspect to take into account is the southern government of the State of Missouri bought enough accouterment sets from Magee and George of New Orleans, Louisiana to outfit every Missouri confederate soldier twice. Missouri Boot and Shoe offers these accouterments to purchase. Another Aspect to take into account is there was tons of English goods being poured into Texas and Louisiana and there is no doubt that some could have easily made its way into the hands of Missouri troops.

Belts and Buckles- Should be made of brown or black leather and must have a period buckle of any sort. Period buckles must be civilian, square C.S., a documented version of the oval C.S., Georgia frame, fork tongue, English imported snake buckle, billet buckle, or roller buckle.

Cartridge box- 1839 Musket Cartridge box (.69 cal), 1857 cartridge box (.58 cal or .69 cal) , 1861 cartridge box, or English  made Thaxton Box. Any confederate copy of the before listed cartridge boxes are appropriate.

Cartridge box sling- Leather or canvas to fit your cartridge box

Cap Pouch- C.S. , U.S., or imported English issue black or brown leather

Canteen- tin or copper drum canteen, 1858 smooth side canteen, U.S. bullseye canteen, wood civilian canteen

Haversack- civilian patterns, C.S. or U.S. issued

Knapsack- By far the most underrepresented piece of equipment in this hobby. Must be of C.S. issued, "captured federal", or English Import.

  • Any Confederate issue wood framed pack

  • "Captured" Federal 1853 Double Bag Knapsack

  • Mexican War Style Knapsack

  • Kibler Knapsack (confederate copy of the Mexican War Knapsack)

  • Any type of reproduction of the 1856 British Regulation pack. Variations include reproductions of Isaac Campbell and Co. or Ross and Co. Enough of these were imported into the Confederacy that possibly 1 in 4 of all Confederate troops were issued with them.

Musket/Rifle- Any 1816 or 1840 conversion musket, 1842 Springfield, 1855 Springfield, 1861 Springfield, 1863 Springfield, 1862 and beyond Richmond's, 1854 Lorenz's, and 1853 Enfield's.

Tent- Shelter half or A frame

Accouterments for Missouri State Guard

Missouri State Guard troops were in great need of proper equipment, weapons, and uniforms. Therefore, they used large amounts of civilian and previous federal patterns of weapons and accouterments.

Belts and Buckles- Civilian and previous patterns of federal army belts and buckles are very appropriate. These can include billet belts, roller buckle belts, frame buckles, and Mexican war "U.S." buckles.

Ammunition Pouches and Cartridge Boxes- Previous federal accouterments dating all the way back to the War of 1812 are completely appropriate. Civilian ammunition pouches were also very prominent as well as powder horns. Suggestions for previous cartridges boxes can include the pattern 1808 Cartridge Box(.69 cal), pattern 1839 cartridge box (.69 cal), and pattern 1857 cartridge box(.58 cal or .69 cal).

Cap Pouch- Previous federal patterns and civilian patterns.

Canteens- Tin or wooden canteens are totally acceptable as long as they can pass for civilian.

Haversacks- Civilian haversacks are the best to use, however, previous patterns of federal issue are acceptable.

Muskets/Rifles- Any civilian rifles or shotguns of flintlock and percussion are acceptable. Any previous Federal issue muskets in flintlock or percussion such as the 1795 Springfield, 1812 Contracts, 1816 Springfield/Harpers Ferry, 1840 Springfield/Harpers Ferry, 1842 Springfield/Harpers Ferry, or 1855 Springfield/Harpers Ferry.  All shotguns must be long enough for safety purposes and all flintlocks must have flashguards!

 

Places to buy items

James Country Mercantile- Specializes in all supplies (especially within Missouri impressions of all sorts).

Fall Creek- Specializes in all supplies.

Blockade Runner - Specializes in all supplies.

Regimental Quartermaster- Specializes in all supplies (has a very good section for high quality campaigner gear).

Wambaugh White and Co.- Specializes in high quality clothing.

NJ Sekela- Specializes in high quality clothing and accouterments.

Missouri Boot and Shoe-  Specializes in high quality footwear, accouterments, and knapsacks.

Fugawee- Specializes in footwear.

Lodgewood Mfg- Specializes in original and reproduction firearms and gunsmithing.

Dixie Gun Works- Specializes in original and reproduction firearms.

Dirty Billy Hats- Specializes in headgear.

Clearwater Hats- Specializes in headgear.

A.C.W. Knapsacks- Specializes in many types of high quality knapsacks.

 

Make a Free Website with Yola.